What Three Years has taught this Gluten Free Cook

Life is good and life without gluten is… the new normal .

GF Food (1)

In the beginning, and every coeliac disease sufferer can tell you at least the month and year of the beginning of their gluten free life, the transition to a gluten free diet is chaotic.

There is no one easy one-size fits all collection of recipes.

There are no guidelines to warn you about how the transition will affect you emotionally, socially and mentally.

There is no simple list of packaged gf products that the individual will ‘like’.

There is no longer the luxury of only shopping at one supermarket.

It is said that “time is a great healer” and this is certainly true for coeliac disease sufferers.

Time does heal your body because gluten free food is your medicine.

Time does heal your soul as you centre your life around this major life changing shift.

And in time, you master your gluten free life and you find that your life is not defined by coeliac disease.

What have I learnt!

It is three years since by teenage son was diagnosed with coeliac disease and two years since I launched my blog so what has the last three years taught me as a gluten free cook.

1.  Be creative

Colour Serve

2. Be resourceful

Colour

3. Experiment with colour and texture

Colour and Texture

4.  Make food interesting and enticing and colourful

Peanut Cookies and

5. Insist on  honesty when trying new food and as a blogger write with integrity and always acknowledge the owners and sources of recipes you use

Good without glutenSweet TreatsTaste Gluten Free

Reflections

I clearly remember our first gluten free cookbook with unappetising photos of food all in shades of beige, off white, light brown and white. I thought, how am I going to sell gluten free food if it all looks so boring and colourless.

I clearly remember the unpleasant smell of our first store bought gluten free meat pies. I tried to lie my way through how tasty the pie was, but this lasted less than 2 minutes.  From that point forward if my son rejected food on taste, look, texture or smell, then I listened and acknowledged his need to take control of his gf food preferences.

And I clearly remember the emotional roller coaster ride of those first 18 months to 2 years.

Community

I have learnt that community is integral to a coeliac disease sufferer. Family,  friends, teachers, doctors, bloggers, cookbook writers…

I am grateful to the many people who support my son and his gluten free diet and those friends, family members and bloggers who continue to provide me with new gf recipes to try.

Life is good and life without gluten is… the new normal .

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