Tag Archives: gluten free teenager

Muesli Slice

muesli slice 2

This slice is so good that even my sons will ignore the ‘green’ bits and go back for seconds.

Ingredients 1 handful sesame seeds 1 handful shredded coconut 1 handful slivered almond 1 handful flaked almonds 1 handful dried apricot 1 handful pepitas 1 handful currants or sultanas 120 g gluten free corn flakes 100 g gluten free rice bubbles 4 gluten free weet bix 150 g peanut butter 250 g honey 250 g butter 270 g  brown sugar   Method In a frying pan, toast sesame seeds, shredded coconut and almonds. In a saucepan, melt peanut butter, honey, butter and brown sugar. Reduce heat and continue to stir until sugar has dissolved and sauce begins to caramelise. In a large bowl, add all dry ingredients and mix. Stir in caramel sauce, press into tins and place in fridge. Once set, cut slice into small pieces.

Chicken, Cheese and Chorizo Quesadillas

Great for an easy weekend meal or a snack or a way to use up left over meats.

There are so many variations on this theme  with this recipe using a few core ingredients.   You can use left over roast chicken or a store bought bbq chicken or shredded Sun Pork.  You can substitute cabana for chorizo and you can add in 1/4 cup taco sauce or a small can of red kidney beans.         

IngredientsQ (2)

500 g cooked chicken diced

4 shallots, finely sliced

2 chorizo chopped and cooked

1 red chili finely diced

150 – 200 g grated cheese (we use a Pizza Cheese packet mix or use half mozzarella and half cheddar)

Salt and pepper to taste

8 corn tortillas

MethodQ

Place all ingredients in a bowl and mix to combine.

Lay out 4 corn tortillas and divide mixture evenly between them.  Top with remaining tortillas.

Place under the griller (two at a time) or use a large heavy duty non stick frying pan (one at a time).

Once browned, turn over tortilla and cook the other side until the cheese is melting.

Cut quesadillas into quarters and serve.

Florentine Slice

An oldie but a goodie and gluten free… Florentines

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In a light bulb moment in our early days of gluten free, I realised that there WERE some of my favourite recipes that I could still use.  This is one of those recipes that I hadn’t made for a long, long time but it has now resurfaced as a favourite gluten free item.

You can make this recipe as a slice as per the recipe or alternatively drop spoonfuls onto baking paper or spoon mixture into lightly oiled patty cake tins. The last time I made Florentines, I used  a scone cutter and spooned and tampered the mixture for a more uniform Florentine. Once cooled spread  or drizzle with melted chocolate.

Florentine Slice

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You can change the mixture according to the fruit and nut mix you have in the pantry.

Ingredients

185 g (gf) dark chocolate

3/4 cup sultanas

2 cups crushed (gf) cornflakes

1/2 cup roasted unsalted peanuts

60 g glace cherries

2/3 cup condensed milk

Method

1.   Line base of lamington tin 28 cm x 18 cm with greased aluminium foil.

2.  Melt chocolate over double boiler or in microwave.

3. Spread chocolate into tin and refrigerate until set.

4. Combine sultanas, cornflakes, peanuts, chopped cherries and condensed milk into bowl and mix well.

5.  Using back of spoon, spread mixture over chocolate base.

6. Bake in moderate oven 15 – 20 minutes.

7. Cool, refrigerate until set and then cut into squares.

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(the Australian Women’s Weekly, “The Big Book of Beautiful Biscuits”)

Joanne’s Fried Chicken

aka JFC

My sons have warmed to the idea that this chicken IS better than KFC… so if you can’t buy LFGF Chicken Seasoning locally, then  order it on-line.

Ingredients

500 g chicken cut

LFGF Chicken seasoning

1 egg beaten with 1 teaspoon waterIMG_0602

Oil for frying

Method

In bowl mix egg and water.

On a plate place LFGF Chicken seasoning

Dip chicken in egg mix.

Roll chicken in seasoning mix to cover.

Heat oil in deep fryer on high and fry chicken in batches until half cooked.

Put chicken to drain on kitchen paper towel.

Return chicken to deep fryer until cooked.

Drain chicken on paper towel.

Serve chicken with salad.

Peanut Butter Mousse

The original recipe is for a Peanut Marshmallow Tart with a chocolate biscuit and butter base which I ripped out of a Courier Mail newspaper. With limited time, I decided to make the filling only as a mousse which set beautifully.  My sons know I need honest feedback and so one said, “you should have used smooth peanut butter” and I should have, as the recipe called for smooth but I only had crunchy in the house.  My other son quietly said, “there were no marshmallows in it” as he had been looking for the chunks of marshmallow in the mousse that he imagined because after all the name of the recipe says so.  So with this feedback I promise to use smooth peanut butter next time and have deleted marshmallow from the recipe title. But you could always stir through at the end additional cut marshmallows to add texture to the mousse. Ingredients 32 vanilla marshmallows, cut into smaller piecesPeanutButter Mousse 2 tablespoons milk 3/4 cup smooth peanut butter 300 ml thickened cream 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/4 cup salted roasted peanuts, roughly chopped Method Place marshmallows, milk and peanut butter in a saucepan over medium-low heat. Cook, stirring for 10 minutes or until melted and smooth. Transfer mixture to a bowl and stand for 5- 10 minutes to cool. Using an electric mixer, beat cream and vanilla until soft peaks form. Add 1/4 cream to marshmallow mixture.  Stir to combine. Fold through remaining cream. Spoon mixture in serving dishes and refrigerate for 3-4 hours or until set. Sprinkle with chopped peanuts.

Boiled Fruit Cake

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My favourite fruit cake is the boiled fruit cake.  I love it for its rich colour and overall moistness.  Saying that I have found two fruit cake recipes using packet mixes which are  well worth the baking effort, which I also include below.

1. The Boiled Fruit Cake is an oldie but a goodie and  it converts well to gluten free.

Ingredients

375 g mixed fruit

1 cup sugar

1 cup water

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon mixed spice

1/2 teaspoon salt

180 g butter or margarine

1 egg

1 cup gluten free SR flour

1/2 cup gluten free plain flour

1/2 cup almond meal

2 level teaspoons baking soda

1 dessert spoon hot water

1 tablespoon rum

Method

1. Place mixed fruit, sugar, water, spice, salt and butter in saucepan.

2. Allow to boil for ten minutes.

3. Allow to cool.

4. Beat egg and add to cooled mixture.

5. Fold in sifted flours and almond meal, dissolved soda and rum.

6. Mix well together then pour into a prepared cake tin.  For lunch boxes I use muffin tins lined with paper cases as the cake holds together better for the lunch box.  Adjust cooking time accordingly.

7. Bake in slow to moderate oven for 1 1/2 hours for cake.

2. Brandy Fruit Cake

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This recipe was featured in the latest yum.com online magazine. I think my oven was the problem as the cake was a little dry.  The process of soaking fruit then coating fruit with bread mix ensured that the fruit did not sink but is distributed throughout the cake. The recipe also gives you some suggestions if you wish to bake a bigger or smaller cake.  Thank you Decadent Alternatives.

3. Boiled Fruit Cake and Christmas Cake

Ingredients

375 g mixed dried fruit

60 g margarine

200 ml boiling water

1 packet Basco Gluten Free Butter Cake Mix

2 eggs lightly beaten

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

pinch ground cinnamon

Method

Preheat oven to 180C (fan forced 160C). Grease a 20 cm square cake pan and line with baking paper. (10 muffin papers)

In a medium saucepan, combine dried fruit, margarine and boiling water.  Bring to boil and simmer for 5 minutes.  Take off heat, stir and allow to stand for 5 minutes to cool.

In a bowl, empty contents of Basco cake mix sachet together with cinnamon, eggs and vanilla.  Mix to combine.

Add fruit mixture to cake batter and beat with a wooden spoon until combined. Spread mixture into prepared pan and bake for 40 – 45 minutes.  Alternatively, divide mixture into 10 muffin cases and bake for 20 – 25 minutes.  Insert a skewer to test when cake is cooked.  For cake, allow to stand for 10 minutes before gently turning out onto a wire rack to cook.

From “The Australian Coeliac” and Joy Williams – Gold Coast.

Fruit Cake (1)

Haloumi Salads : A couple of options

Before you think that my teenager actually eats salads, I must own up: I make salads because I know my son will eat possibly one ingredient in the bowl and I hope one day he might venture out and actually eat the green and red things on the plate as well.

I do know that in a push, when there is nothing else to eat, KJ will eat salad greens, but they are definitely not his first preference.

He does like haloumi so here are a couple of his liked haloumi recipes:

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Pan Fried Haloumi with Lemon, Garlic and Thyme

Ingredients

2 x 180 g pkts haloumi, drained

1 tablespoon olive oil

Zest from 1 lemon (use a vegetable peeler)

2 garlic cloves, sliced

6 sprigs fresh thyme

1 tablespoon lemon juice

Serve with lemon wedges and rustic gluten free bread

Method

Cut haloumi into 12 rectangular pieces.

Heat the oil in a non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat.  Cook the lemon zest, garlic and thyme stirring for 2 minutes to develop the flavours.

Add the haloumi to the pan and cook for 2 minutes each side or until golden.

Drizzle with lemon juice and transfer to a large serving plate.

Season with pepper and serve immediately with sliced bread and lemon wedges.

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Haloumi and Pomegranate Salad

Ingredients

Cos lettuce

Mini cucumbers

Pomegranate seeds

Haloumi cheese  (pan fry sliced haloumi)

Dressing: 2 tabs honey, 2 tabs lemon, 2 tabs olive oil,  1 tabs oregano leaves chopped, sea salt flakes and pepper. Whisk in bowl and drizzle over salad.

Heirloom Tomato and Haloumi Salad

 Ingredients

140 ml olive oil

1 garlic clove, crushed

2 tablespoons shiraz vinegar or red wine vinegar

50 g unsalted butter, 2 garlic cloves, crushed and 4 sliced and cubed gluten free multigrain bread (to make croutons or use Glutino Bagel Chips)

250 g haloumi, sliced, pan fried

500 g mixed heirloom tomatoes sliced (or use a colourful variety of tomatoes)

1 cup rocket, baby spinach and basil leaves

Method

Whisk 1/3 cup oil, garlic and vinegar together in a bowl, season and set aside.

To make croutons, heat 2 tabs oil and butter in a frypan over medium heat.  Cooked bread for 4 minutes until crips.  Add garlic and remaining 1 tabs oil and cook for 1 – 2 minutes.  Drain on paper towel.  Cool.

In a serving bowl or platter, combine croutons, dressing and remaining ingredients.

(Delicious Dec 14/Jan 15)

Boules de Neige

This is a Margaret Fullerton recipe found in both the taste.com.au December 2013 magazine and online at SBS – Food.

Easy to make, the recipe uses  gluten free ingredients that most of us have in our cupboard: hazelnut meal, almond meal, icing sugar and egg white.

Boules de Neige

 

GF Christmas Stocking Filler

Jelly Beans

Browsing the Christmas shelves at Myer yesterday, I found the Jelly Belly section and thought that their “Cocktail Classics” was perfect for a Christmas stocking filler for the gluten free teenager in the house.

Dear Doctor…

An Open Letter to GPs and Paediatric Gastroenterologists

From a mother of a teenager with Coeliac Disease

LISTEN, DON’T JUDGE AND LOOK AT THE BIG PICTURE

Six months ago#,  I took my 15 year old son to the doctor’s for yet another bout of gastro and stomach cramps.  He had been off school for three days which had been preceded by a day off school 10 days previously.

Luckily this doctor, not our usual GP,  listened.  I was convinced that my son must have had some bacterial infection or parasite that just wasn’t going away, as 6 months previously he had missed some 10 – 12 days from school over a period of a month. And this GP listened when my son tried to put into words what his cramps felt like.

This doctor did not judge: he did not judge me or my son and sent my son off for tests.

And he listened.

As I glanced at the request for blood testing, I saw that the doctor was screening my son for Coeliac Disease.

Suddenly, the last 12 – 13 years all made sense.

In September the previous year, I had taken my son to our GP twice to discuss the latest ongoing or recurring bout of gastro and debilitating cramps and to obtain medical certificates for the school.  We discussed the normal treatment which included hydration and a gradual return to food with a dry biscuit or toast. As well, a stool sample was taken.  But I do remember the look I was given: that look which bordered on, this mother is overly sensitive to the workings of her son’s bowel movements and/or maybe this teenager is avoiding school.

Our visit to a Paediatric Gastroenterologist some 12 years previous also saw my son’s problems summarily dismissed.  After some 1 – 2 years of ongoing bouts of gastro, my toddler’s stomach cramps had escalated to the stage that my husband and I took him to the hospital in the early hours of one morning. From there, our GP referred us to a specialist who took a summary of our boy’s health, asked pertinent questions about milk, cordial and fruit juice consumption and then explained that gastro bugs tend to spread among toddlers at Day Care.

“ But our son doesn’t go to Day Care” we said and I then remember the look I was given: that look which bordered on, this mother is overprotective of her son and/or overly sensitive to the workings of her son’s bowel movements.  Suddenly, my son’s health outcomes were judged on how the Paediatric Gastroenterologist saw me.  Did he listen to find out that on the days I worked, my son was cared for by a nanny  or that at home I also had a preschooler and two teenagers? This judgement was further reinforced by his parting comment at the end of our second visit : “And when is your son going to Preschool?”  Our boy was only 3!*

On our return visit to the specialist, and after blood tests which all seemed fine, he commented that he could send us off for more blood tests but he didn’t think this was necessary or he could do an endoscopy but he also believed that this intrusive procedure was not necessary.  I cannot remember him ever mentioning our son being screened for Coeliac Disease.  And the specialist did not mention endoscopy in any context.  And off we went, still without answers as to what our son’s health problems were.

In those intervening 12 years, my son continued to have ongoing problems with gastro, vomitting and stomach cramps.  And we continued to visit our GP for advice and treatment.  Rotavirus.  Giardia.  Tummy Bug. Virus.  He was even tested for Cryptosporidium. We installed a water filter to filter out any nasties but still the bouts continued sporadically.  I suppose after a while, I even came to believe these problems were normal.  It was just something going around, although I never could fully understand why only my youngest always seemed to get that “something” that was going around.

Luckily for my son, it only took 12 years before we found a doctor who listened and didn’t judge and we thank this doctor for looking at the “big picture” and searching for some answers.

My son’s journey is similar to so many others who eventually find themselves with a diagnosis of Coeliac Disease.

And I am sure that these people also wished that their medical practitioners listened, didn’t judge and looked at the big picture.

Always a Mum

January 2013

*Preschool age was 5 years old.

# I wrote this six months after our son KJ was given his Coeliac Disease diagnosis.  It took many months for my anger to subside and be replaced by disappointment  for the many times our family doctor had failed my son.